All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

QUANTUM SHIFTS

Moderator
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA

10:10 - Hyperloop: the broadband for transportation
Nick Earle, SVP global field operations, Hyperloop One, USA
Hyperloop is the first new mode of transportation in more than 100 years. The technology uses electric propulsion and levitation to move passengers and cargo at faster-than-airline speeds through a low-pressure tube with unprecedented energy efficiency. With direct-to-destination service and departures more than once a minute, Hyperloop can turn metro areas into metro stops and create disruptive, 'packetised' transport networks for freight and passengers. Hyperloop One is the only company in the world building an operational commercial system, with a 500m test track in Nevada. Hear how Hyperloop One is building transformative transportation to create a more connected world.

10:40 - Rethinking roads – the future of highways
Tony Marshall, director, ARUP, UK
Transport infrastructure is facing impacts from a range of issues: capacity constraints, population growth and climate change. Faced with these pressures, what does the future hold for highways up to 2050? This presentation explores the forces we believe may shape highways of the future. Reflecting on Arup’s research – Future of Highways – user journeys illustrate how road networks and intermodal transport solutions could operate in years to come, prompting questions including: could driverless vehicles improve the efficiency of roads? And, how can we encourage a step-change in material reuse and material innovation to reduce waste and the need for maintenance?

11:10 - Evaluating the impact of future transport modes
Dr Yvonne Barnard, senior research fellow, University of Leeds, UK
New transport systems are rapidly being developed and tested in the real world. For the evaluation of Intelligent Transport Systems, large-scale Field Operational Tests have provided a major way of determining the potential impact, using a well-established methodology. However, the new generation of automated transport modes requires new ways of providing evidence for the impact, looking beyond safety, mobility and efficiency. Europe, Japan and US are collaborating on impact assessment of road automation, and several European projects are investigating new ways of evaluating pilots with automated transport. The presentation will provide a vision for the future of evaluation of innovative systems.

11:40 - Changing the way we think about urban transport
Lars Hesselgren, director of research / senior associate partner, PLP Architecture, UK
Vehicles are becoming smarter, opening up new opportunities to make transportation more efficient, more economic and more environmentally friendly. Instead of competing with each other, how can cars collaborate with each other to avoid known traffic problems, such as congestion and parking? If such collaboration is to be achieved, where does it make the most sense? High capacity transport systems need dedicated tracks in order to achieve useful capacity, reduce travel times and be safe. If we turn to urban mass transport we see that on the whole, as cities grow, the only place we have where we can put new infrastructure to service existing parts of the city, is underground. This approach leads us to a system based on tunnels for electric cars, where digital control ensures there is no congestion and the system takes you directly to your destination, without interchanging, as is often the case with traditional public transport. Roads take up a huge amount of space – we should rethink how mass transportation works and use public realm above ground for people, not for cars.

12:10 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Quantum shift - key enablers and barriers
John D'Arcy, transportation development director, Mott MacDonald, UK
The advancement of technology transcends any specific sector – for example, the integrated technology needed to pilot an autonomous vehicle has been developed and transferred into the automotive sector from multiple areas that include robotics, global positioning and detection. In this paper, illustrated using case studies from our extensive experience of complex surface transport operations with network operators and transport authorities, we identify and explore technology transfer and the key enablers and barriers within transport planning, modelling, infrastructure design, systems integration and network operations that are required to enable the potential quantum shifts in tackling surface transport congestion.

14:30 - Delft Hyperloop: fast as a plane, convenient as a train
Maurits Houck, Technical officer, Delft Hyperloop, NETHERLANDS
Thijs Haselhoff, New business development manager, Altheris BV, NETHERLANDS
It started with the challenge from Tesla’s CEO to develop a future transportation method. Technical University Delft successfully developed a Delft Hyperloop with the use of Altheris's sensors. The Hyperloop travels through a tube, starting off on wheels and floating on magnets there after. This future way of travelling has many advantages over current transportation methods. It is fast (Amsterdam - Paris in 30 minutes), cheap (cheaper than flying), environment friendly (powered by renewable energies) and safe (no human errors).During the presentation we’ll discuss the development of the Hyperloop along with the importance of the Altheris sensors and its effect on future (business) traveling of the future.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Cognitive mobility with personalisation and IoT
Hakan Kostepen, executive director - strategy and innovation, Panasonic, USA
The presentation will discuss shifting transportation elements to mobility with personalisation and IoT tokens around cognitive intelligent life.

16:00 - How to change paradigms to establish sustainable and competitive transportation
Dr Vincent Bourquin, professor, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, SWITZERLAND
The existing transportation systems have shown their limits in fulfilling the requirements of performance and sustainability. The massive growth of transportation has led to significant negative impacts on people, society and the environment. It is clear that disruptive ways need to be established as soon as possible. But which pioneering country or investor will make the first step ? On what path should we go ? The example of Switzerland and the constant evolution of the Swissmetro project for more than four decades show the potential of improvement associated with an adequate combination of technologies integrated in an engineering systems approach.

16:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– Can we Create Cities Free From Traffic Jams? Should Cars be Banned From City Centres? What Radical Changes can we Introduce to Ensure Cities of the Future Avoid Total Gridlock?
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA
Tony Marshall, director, ARUP, UK
Lars Hesselgren, director of research / senior associate partner, PLP Architecture, UK
Dr Yvonne Barnard, senior research fellow, University of Leeds, UK
Hakan Kostepen, executive director - strategy and innovation, Panasonic, USA

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

QUANTUM SHIFTS

Moderator
Dr Vincent Bourquin, professor, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

09:00 - Vuelytics – artificial intelligence in transport
Dr Tony Rhoades, CEO, PCRL Vuelytics, UK
The presentation will show how Vuelytics applied artificial intelligence and novel sensor systems are on the verge of bringing about a quantum shift in transport. The outcome is new big data on the cloud, new business models, and a new language and environment for future transport supply chains – likely to cause major disruptions in multiple billion-dollar markets (tyres, servicing, fleet management, insurance, safety, and much more). With 1.2 billion vehicles on the road today, forecast to reach two billion by 2035 (Wards, 2016), this quantum shift will be far reaching.

09:30 - Disruptive transportation technologies in support of sustainable urban development
Dr Christopher Drew, director of sustainability, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gil Architecture, USA
The symbiosis between mass transit and dense urban development is facing an onset of potentially disruptive transportation technologies as the growth of low-cost on-demand autonomous transit becomes a reality over the coming years. Changes in road usage, car parking requirements, goods delivery and waste collection strategies, etc. require that we rethink how we configure the relationship between people and transit from a sustainability and urban design perspective. This presentation looks at opportunities coming up and asks the question: How to design new high-density districts and optimise existing ones to maximise benefits from future transportation opportunities?

10:00 - projectMOVE – the future of urban mobility
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA
From autonomous taxis to on-demand public transit to integrated bicycle networks, we are in the midst of an incredible groundswell of first- and last-mile transit innovations that are simple yet transformative in impact. The presentation will highlight internal R&D focusing on first- and last-mile transit innovations from ProjectMOVE, Populous’s internal research initiative. Insights will be shared on disruption in US transportation and the key influences that are reimagining the sustainable and equitable public transit systems of the future, driven by the confluence of technological innovation, private-sector investment and the inherent challenges of an ageing national infrastructure.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Human-centred mobility for an optimised transport service
Alexandre Milot, industrial liaison officer, Transportation Center of EPFL, SWITZERLAND
Claudio Leonardi, founder and head of the Clip-Air project, Transportation Center of EPFL, SWITZERLAND
The Transportation Centre of EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne in Switzerland) acts as the entry point for external partners eager to initiate cutting-edge research related to transportation and mobility. We are specifically interested in user’s preferences, mobility behaviour, etc using sociology, mathematical modelling and data science. We also develop technologies serving the mobility industry dealing with face recognition, Brain-Machine Interface, Medtech, etc. Finally, we endeavour to shape transportation systems through traffic management, timetabling, multimodality, etc. “Clip-Air” is a typical concept of an innovative aircraft able to offer on-demand air transportation combined with the rail network.

11:30 - Don’t predict the future – envision it
Karel Golta, CEO, Indeed Innovation GmbH, GERMANY
Stop thinking about cars, about transporting people from A to B, and start thinking about larger ecosystems of values. It is not about individual technology but about the interplay of human-driven desires that will drive a better future. The rise of AI (artificial intelligence) and autonomous technology will lead to business and value offerings never seen before. The presentation will take you on a journey exploring fundamental new ways that autonomous cars, online shopping and retail, personal finance and healthcare will interlace and thus create a lifestyle ecosystem of the 21st. century.

12:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Demand-responsive transport: the way to a car-free city
Ellen Kuder, vice president of growth, door2door, GERMANY
The car-free city is the ultimate goal to improve the quality of life of citizens in a sustainable manner. Most concepts believe that public transport will be obsolete and replaced by alternative modes of transportation. However, only by enhancing traditional means of transportation with demand-responsive solutions (DRT) will we be able to achieve the car-free city. Our approach allows a data-driven integration of DRT into the public transport network, expanding the transport offer and making the private car redundant.

14:30 - Integrating traffic management operations with connected/automated vehicle data
Stephen Novosad, senior project manager, HNTB Corp, USA
As the deployment of connected/automated vehicles becomes a reality, massive amounts of data will be generated. With much of the focus on getting the technologies proved and deployed, little has been done to consider the impact that these vehicles and their data will have on agencies who are responsible for managing roadways, expressway, arterials, etc. This presentation discusses the impact of these vehicles and their data from a traffic operations perspective.

15:00 - Easy Motion – a new view of trucking
Ilya King/Knyazev, CEO & co-founder, Easy Motion Ltd, RUSSIA
Easy Motion is an unmanned transport service using the cargo platform – a complete truck without a cabin. We’ve discovered a solution: the convoy of trucks consists of one truck with a driver and three or four unmanned platforms following the traffic functions of the leader and given distance. Today production cars are equipped with these systems, and we will not invest in them. Thus, we suggest an efficient transportation system with impressive productivity: organising relay traffic, where drivers with licence category B conduct three or four trucks, providing transit up to 22 hours.

More Speakers Being Added

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

QUANTUM SHIFTS

Moderator
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA

10:10 - Hyperloop: the broadband for transportation
Nick Earle, SVP global field operations, Hyperloop One, USA
Hyperloop is the first new mode of transportation in more than 100 years. The technology uses electric propulsion and levitation to move passengers and cargo at faster-than-airline speeds through a low-pressure tube with unprecedented energy efficiency. With direct-to-destination service and departures more than once a minute, Hyperloop can turn metro areas into metro stops and create disruptive, 'packetised' transport networks for freight and passengers. Hyperloop One is the only company in the world building an operational commercial system, with a 500m test track in Nevada. Hear how Hyperloop One is building transformative transportation to create a more connected world.

10:40 - Rethinking roads – the future of highways
Tony Marshall, director, ARUP, UK
Transport infrastructure is facing impacts from a range of issues: capacity constraints, population growth and climate change. Faced with these pressures, what does the future hold for highways up to 2050? This presentation explores the forces we believe may shape highways of the future. Reflecting on Arup’s research – Future of Highways – user journeys illustrate how road networks and intermodal transport solutions could operate in years to come, prompting questions including: could driverless vehicles improve the efficiency of roads? And, how can we encourage a step-change in material reuse and material innovation to reduce waste and the need for maintenance?

11:10 - Evaluating the impact of future transport modes
Dr Yvonne Barnard, senior research fellow, University of Leeds, UK
New transport systems are rapidly being developed and tested in the real world. For the evaluation of Intelligent Transport Systems, large-scale Field Operational Tests have provided a major way of determining the potential impact, using a well-established methodology. However, the new generation of automated transport modes requires new ways of providing evidence for the impact, looking beyond safety, mobility and efficiency. Europe, Japan and US are collaborating on impact assessment of road automation, and several European projects are investigating new ways of evaluating pilots with automated transport. The presentation will provide a vision for the future of evaluation of innovative systems.

11:40 - Changing the way we think about urban transport
Lars Hesselgren, director of research / senior associate partner, PLP Architecture, UK
Vehicles are becoming smarter, opening up new opportunities to make transportation more efficient, more economic and more environmentally friendly. Instead of competing with each other, how can cars collaborate with each other to avoid known traffic problems, such as congestion and parking? If such collaboration is to be achieved, where does it make the most sense? High capacity transport systems need dedicated tracks in order to achieve useful capacity, reduce travel times and be safe. If we turn to urban mass transport we see that on the whole, as cities grow, the only place we have where we can put new infrastructure to service existing parts of the city, is underground. This approach leads us to a system based on tunnels for electric cars, where digital control ensures there is no congestion and the system takes you directly to your destination, without interchanging, as is often the case with traditional public transport. Roads take up a huge amount of space – we should rethink how mass transportation works and use public realm above ground for people, not for cars.

12:10 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Quantum shift - key enablers and barriers
John D'Arcy, transportation development director, Mott MacDonald, UK
The advancement of technology transcends any specific sector – for example, the integrated technology needed to pilot an autonomous vehicle has been developed and transferred into the automotive sector from multiple areas that include robotics, global positioning and detection. In this paper, illustrated using case studies from our extensive experience of complex surface transport operations with network operators and transport authorities, we identify and explore technology transfer and the key enablers and barriers within transport planning, modelling, infrastructure design, systems integration and network operations that are required to enable the potential quantum shifts in tackling surface transport congestion.

14:30 - Delft Hyperloop: fast as a plane, convenient as a train
Maurits Houck, Technical officer, Delft Hyperloop, NETHERLANDS
Thijs Haselhoff, New business development manager, Altheris BV, NETHERLANDS
It started with the challenge from Tesla’s CEO to develop a future transportation method. Technical University Delft successfully developed a Delft Hyperloop with the use of Altheris's sensors. The Hyperloop travels through a tube, starting off on wheels and floating on magnets there after. This future way of travelling has many advantages over current transportation methods. It is fast (Amsterdam - Paris in 30 minutes), cheap (cheaper than flying), environment friendly (powered by renewable energies) and safe (no human errors).During the presentation we’ll discuss the development of the Hyperloop along with the importance of the Altheris sensors and its effect on future (business) traveling of the future.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Cognitive mobility with personalisation and IoT
Hakan Kostepen, executive director - strategy and innovation, Panasonic, USA
The presentation will discuss shifting transportation elements to mobility with personalisation and IoT tokens around cognitive intelligent life.

16:00 - How to change paradigms to establish sustainable and competitive transportation
Dr Vincent Bourquin, professor, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, SWITZERLAND
The existing transportation systems have shown their limits in fulfilling the requirements of performance and sustainability. The massive growth of transportation has led to significant negative impacts on people, society and the environment. It is clear that disruptive ways need to be established as soon as possible. But which pioneering country or investor will make the first step ? On what path should we go ? The example of Switzerland and the constant evolution of the Swissmetro project for more than four decades show the potential of improvement associated with an adequate combination of technologies integrated in an engineering systems approach.

16:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– Can we Create Cities Free From Traffic Jams? Should Cars be Banned From City Centres? What Radical Changes can we Introduce to Ensure Cities of the Future Avoid Total Gridlock?
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA
Tony Marshall, director, ARUP, UK
Lars Hesselgren, director of research / senior associate partner, PLP Architecture, UK
Dr Yvonne Barnard, senior research fellow, University of Leeds, UK
Hakan Kostepen, executive director - strategy and innovation, Panasonic, USA

More Speakers Being Added

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

QUANTUM SHIFTS

Moderator
Dr Vincent Bourquin, professor, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

09:00 - Vuelytics – artificial intelligence in transport
Dr Tony Rhoades, CEO, PCRL Vuelytics, UK
The presentation will show how Vuelytics applied artificial intelligence and novel sensor systems are on the verge of bringing about a quantum shift in transport. The outcome is new big data on the cloud, new business models, and a new language and environment for future transport supply chains – likely to cause major disruptions in multiple billion-dollar markets (tyres, servicing, fleet management, insurance, safety, and much more). With 1.2 billion vehicles on the road today, forecast to reach two billion by 2035 (Wards, 2016), this quantum shift will be far reaching.

09:30 - Disruptive transportation technologies in support of sustainable urban development
Dr Christopher Drew, director of sustainability, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gil Architecture, USA
The symbiosis between mass transit and dense urban development is facing an onset of potentially disruptive transportation technologies as the growth of low-cost on-demand autonomous transit becomes a reality over the coming years. Changes in road usage, car parking requirements, goods delivery and waste collection strategies, etc. require that we rethink how we configure the relationship between people and transit from a sustainability and urban design perspective. This presentation looks at opportunities coming up and asks the question: How to design new high-density districts and optimise existing ones to maximise benefits from future transportation opportunities?

10:00 - projectMOVE – the future of urban mobility
Derrick Choi, principal, Populous, USA
From autonomous taxis to on-demand public transit to integrated bicycle networks, we are in the midst of an incredible groundswell of first- and last-mile transit innovations that are simple yet transformative in impact. The presentation will highlight internal R&D focusing on first- and last-mile transit innovations from ProjectMOVE, Populous’s internal research initiative. Insights will be shared on disruption in US transportation and the key influences that are reimagining the sustainable and equitable public transit systems of the future, driven by the confluence of technological innovation, private-sector investment and the inherent challenges of an ageing national infrastructure.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Human-centred mobility for an optimised transport service
Alexandre Milot, industrial liaison officer, Transportation Center of EPFL, SWITZERLAND
Claudio Leonardi, founder and head of the Clip-Air project, Transportation Center of EPFL, SWITZERLAND
The Transportation Centre of EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne in Switzerland) acts as the entry point for external partners eager to initiate cutting-edge research related to transportation and mobility. We are specifically interested in user’s preferences, mobility behaviour, etc using sociology, mathematical modelling and data science. We also develop technologies serving the mobility industry dealing with face recognition, Brain-Machine Interface, Medtech, etc. Finally, we endeavour to shape transportation systems through traffic management, timetabling, multimodality, etc. “Clip-Air” is a typical concept of an innovative aircraft able to offer on-demand air transportation combined with the rail network.

11:30 - Don’t predict the future – envision it
Karel Golta, CEO, Indeed Innovation GmbH, GERMANY
Stop thinking about cars, about transporting people from A to B, and start thinking about larger ecosystems of values. It is not about individual technology but about the interplay of human-driven desires that will drive a better future. The rise of AI (artificial intelligence) and autonomous technology will lead to business and value offerings never seen before. The presentation will take you on a journey exploring fundamental new ways that autonomous cars, online shopping and retail, personal finance and healthcare will interlace and thus create a lifestyle ecosystem of the 21st. century.

12:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Demand-responsive transport: the way to a car-free city
Ellen Kuder, vice president of growth, door2door, GERMANY
The car-free city is the ultimate goal to improve the quality of life of citizens in a sustainable manner. Most concepts believe that public transport will be obsolete and replaced by alternative modes of transportation. However, only by enhancing traditional means of transportation with demand-responsive solutions (DRT) will we be able to achieve the car-free city. Our approach allows a data-driven integration of DRT into the public transport network, expanding the transport offer and making the private car redundant.

14:30 - Integrating traffic management operations with connected/automated vehicle data
Stephen Novosad, senior project manager, HNTB Corp, USA
As the deployment of connected/automated vehicles becomes a reality, massive amounts of data will be generated. With much of the focus on getting the technologies proved and deployed, little has been done to consider the impact that these vehicles and their data will have on agencies who are responsible for managing roadways, expressway, arterials, etc. This presentation discusses the impact of these vehicles and their data from a traffic operations perspective.

15:00 - Easy Motion – a new view of trucking
Ilya King/Knyazev, CEO & co-founder, Easy Motion Ltd, RUSSIA
Easy Motion is an unmanned transport service using the cargo platform – a complete truck without a cabin. We’ve discovered a solution: the convoy of trucks consists of one truck with a driver and three or four unmanned platforms following the traffic functions of the leader and given distance. Today production cars are equipped with these systems, and we will not invest in them. Thus, we suggest an efficient transportation system with impressive productivity: organising relay traffic, where drivers with licence category B conduct three or four trucks, providing transit up to 22 hours.

More Speakers Being Added
 

We will examine some remarkably simple changes that would radically transform surface congestion. We will also examine and illustrate macro shifts that would make further significant changes to the overall sustainability and manageability of surface transport.