Getting Transportation Off the Ground

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

GETTING TRANSPORTATION OFF THE GROUND

Moderator
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society, USA

10:10 - Pop.up: modular ground and air passenger concept vehicle system
Jörg Astalosch, CEO, Italdesign, ITALY
Mathias Thomsen, general manager, urban air mobility, Airbus, FRANCE
Several studies show that in the next few years the existing traffic situation in megacities will become even more demanding and the number of megacities will increase. Quality of life in those areas is expected to strongly diminish, and consequently all stakeholders are looking for scalable solutions to contribute to relieving congested roads and reducing emissions. The Pop.up project is more than a single vehicle. It is a whole new concept of mobility: modular, multi-modal, sharable, sustainable and high-tech, involving a whole new landscape, a new idea of transportation implying new infrastructures, new regulations and a new approach to mobility.

10:40 - From flying toys to flying taxis
Dr Stephen Wright, senior lecturer in Avionics and Aircraft Systems, University of the West of England, UK
Quads, UAVs, drones: call them what you will. One thing is clear: power, communications and control technologies have converged to cause a breakthrough in capability and cost, and create a new industry. The usage envelope is now expanding into safety-critical applications, to the extent that automatically piloted personal transport systems are being proposed. This talk examines the vast gulf that must be bridged between systems in the consumer drones that we see everywhere, and those for conventional aircraft. Why are they so cheap and easy to operate, while conventional aircraft are so expensive and demanding? How to cross that bridge?

11:10 - On-demand air taxi services – the future of urban transportation
Florian Reuter, chief executive officer, e-volo GmbH, GERMANY
The future will see an increase in demand for transportation services. Autonomous automobiles will not solve the problem as the road capacity enhancements will be overcompensated by an increase in driven miles. Congestion will continue to pose a serious challenge. On-demand air taxi services will be a fundamental piece of the puzzle to solve these challenges. Initially, we see an implementation of defined point-to-point connections, which will gradually be expanded into full air taxi networks – first piloted, later on-demand and fully autonomous. e-volo’s Volocopter offers revolutionary simplicity in piloting, unprecedented safety and the absence of emission and noise – which makes it the perfect vehicle solution for urban transportation.

11:40 - PATS – beginning or end of a love affair
Klaus Tritschler, partner, Kiska GmbH, AUSTRIA
Personal (electric, autonomous and semi-autonomous) VTOL vehicles are rapidly approaching reality. This paradigm shift in mobility is driven by new technology and the scientific masterminds behind it. Once the technology is proved and available to the market, our love affair will be put to the test. Most companies will likely fail. Only the companies that deliver a consistent and positive end-to-end user experience, and build a trustworthy brand, will ultimately succeed.

12:10 - The future of vertical flight
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society, USA
The helicopter has been the ubiquitous vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft for 75 years. Although many types of compound helicopters and other high-speed rotorcraft aircraft have flown, only the V-22 Osprey reached operational service in the 20th Century. Today, however, numerous advanced civil and military rotorcraft are in development with impressive capabilities. Even more promising is the advances in batteries, electric motors and autonomy that suggest a whole new paradigm shift may be dawning with the advent of electric VTOL aircraft. This presentation will cover the promise and progress of next generation VTOL aircraft in the 21st Century.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - A possible future history of the rise of electric VTOL
Darrell Swanson, principal consultant, AviaSolutions and a Board Member of the British Aviation Group, UK
In this presentation we will review the Uber Elevate paper and propose an alternative history of the rise of sub-regional airlines and eventual fulfilment of Uber’s vision. We will discuss the economics of such sub-regional airlines, outline their likely operating characteristics and identify factors that will be their enablers. Additionally, we will review how sub-regional airlines will reinvigorate beleaguered regional airports and give rise to sub-regional airports. We will also discuss the challenging economic and operating characteristics of airports looking to serve sub-regional airlines.

14:30 - Intra-City aerial mass transportation using internal Rotor Fancraft™
Dr Rafi Yoeli, president and CEO, Urban Aeronautics Ltd, ISRAEL
Following two decades of development, with over 200 successful flight tests of its unmanned 'Cormorant' Fancraft™, Urban Aeronautics is ready to launch its intra-city, Aerial Mass Transportation System initiative. The city of São-Paulo, Brazil, where a drive into the city takes 2.5 hours, is already setting an example for intra-city Air-Taxi systems. Currently, 500 helicopters fly executives to helipads on downtown São-Paulo office buildings every morning and ferrying them back out of the city at the end of the day. Urban Aeronautics envisions a future city having a much wider scale mass-transport, aerial system relying on VTOL aircraft having extraordinary seating capacity in relation to their radically reduced footprint. These attributes will be possible through the company's proprietary Fancraft™" technology. Reduced footprint will liberates future Air-Taxis from the requirement of immense, real-estate hungry, helipads and will bring an order of magnitude increase in passenger transfer capacity per hour compared to present day helicopters.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Cognitive demands and limitations for urban air transportation
Diogo Castilho, military officer and test pilot, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
We can make the use of urban airspace affordable for commuting. As new solutions in control and propulsion deal with noise and emissions limits, it is time to explore the challenges in human-machine interaction and certification. This work discusses the best level of automation for each task and the scenarios in which unsafe control actions interfere with safety. The cognitive limitations are analysed to present feasible mitigating measures for the safe use of vertical urban transportation. The testing phase of prototypes must explore those scenarios to prevent mode confusion and accidents related to the lack of situation awareness.

16:00 - 'Drone taxis' and liability – status and outlook
Gerhard Deiters, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
Today, wherever and whenever new technologies appear at the horizon, the question of 'liability' (and, as a reflex, 'data protection') is raised. What happens in the case of a drone accident? What are the air passengers' rights if the drone is delayed or has to stop its flight due to the battery running low? Before transportation can get off the ground, all these (and some more) questions have to be answered. The presentation provides an overview of the current situation and an outlook on what should come next.

16:30 - 17:00 - Round the Table Discussion
Will urban VTOL/ PAT transportation be achievable and a viable mode of transport within the next 15-30 years?
Jörg Astalosch, CEO, Italdesign, ITALY
Mathias Thomsen, general manager, urban air mobility, Airbus, FRANCE
Florian Reuter, chief executive officer, e-volo GmbH, GERMANY
Markus Farner, manager innovation and advanced technology, Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation, SWITZERLAND


Moderator:
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

GETTING TRANSPORTATION OFF THE GROUND

Moderator
Darrell Swanson, principal consultant, AviaSolutions and a Board Member of the British Aviation Group, UK

09:00 - How German air traffic control plans to control and interface with low-level urban and inter-city ‘flyers'
Ralf Heidger, issue management UAS, DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH, GERMANY
The SESAR outlook study states that the UAS-based transport market segment will start to evolve with some delay, compared to other UAS segments like inspection, surveying, or agriculture. This delay is assumed due to a higher amount of regulative and conceptual preparation, because more risk is involved. There are several activities to note that are on the path to enable such operations: (1) The risk based approach of regulation by EASA elaborates a framework, where the DFS joined the task force to elaborate more precise classifications and related requirements on product certification, registration, identification, and qualification. (2) An European WG for 'U-Space' has been set up to create a concept of UAS traffic in VLL airspace, addressing airspace structure, operations, participants, and needed systems. (3) In JARUS the risk qualification method of 'Specific operation risk assessment' (SORA) has been developed, and the DFS together with representatives of German authorities applies this method in a project for medical transport in urban environment, and elaborates detailed criteria for safe operations. (4) An explorative project has been set up with DTAG, DHL and others to develop a prototypic UAS traffic management system (UTM), which studies aspects of surveillance, mission planning and validation in a number of use cases, including urban transport. Also the interface with ATM is addressed. The safe and fair integration of UAS-based transport will depend on suitable regulation as well as on the evolution of a preferably automated UTM system that provides situational awareness to all relevant participants. Insights and first results from these activities will be presented.

09:30 - What could a regulatory framework look like?
Dr Oliver Heinrich, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
'Classic' passenger transportation via taxi, bus, train and aircraft and transportation of goods is regulated to the tiniest details. For transportation via drones to get off the ground, a new and harmonised legal framework is required, including air traffic control systems (UTM), qualification standards and technical requirements. Further topics are insurance coverage and liability regimes, supporting market development. What is the current status and what could it be like?

10:00 - SORA – risk assessment for unmanned airborne mobility
Markus Farner, manager innovation and advanced technology, Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation, SWITZERLAND
Due the ever-increasing traffic density on all means of ground transportation, logistics and mobility in general are in need of radical new ideas. Mobility is becoming 'intelligent', with people and goods being transported in the most appropriate way by a combination of ground, underground, marine and airborne systems directed towards maximum time and cost efficiency. To be efficient and cost-effective, the new forms of mobility will leverage autonomous vehicles where no driver or pilot is required. As the Swiss CAA we are confronted with concepts and trials of automated logistics by using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS, drones) and automated surveillance of transportation infrastructure by drones. In Switzerland we have been authorising these trials since 2012 using a holistic and risk-based approach – the Guidance for an Authorisation for Low Level Operation (GALLO). In addition, we have led the efforts within the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) to further develop this method into an internationally recognised Specific Operational Risk Assessment (SORA). This new method is used in Switzerland to evaluate the risk of a UAS operation to third parties on the ground and in the air, and to define the required safety barriers as mitigation to ensure safe integration in the aviation system. Because the methodology of the SORA allows the risks associated with the operation as a whole to be understood, new concepts of risk mitigation are possible.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Handling qualities and training requirements for personal aerial vehicles
Dr Michael Jump, senior lecturer, University of Liverpool, UK
Current regulations require that the human must not be removed from the control loop of an air vehicle. This is in direct opposition to the desire of personal aerial vehicle (PAV) developers to create fully autonomous solutions. There my be an interim solution whereby the human will need to be able to take control when required. The presentation will report on results from the myCopter project that show the handling qualities requirements for a PAV and the associated training required for flight-naive occupants.

11:30 - Emission free aviation with hydrogen
Prof Josef Kallo, head of energy systems integration, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), GERMANY
Electric aircraft propulsion could change the way of using air transportation. In combination with low noise propulsors, city and regional transportation becomes realistic. From a 2-seater to a 40 seater aircraft new concepts rise on the horizon. This presentation will reveal latest developments in power train technology and aircraft integration and give an overview of the most feasible studies.

12:00 - Aerocity: a new chapter in high-speed transportation
Dr Arvind Gangoli Rao, associate professor, Delft University of Technology, NETHERLANDS
Aerocity is a new concept in high-speed transportation, which combines features from buses, trains and aircraft. Aerocity is shaped as a low-aspect-ratio wing, which provides lift for the vehicle, further amplified by the extreme wing-in-ground effect. This enables Aerocity to hover in close proximity to the ground and dramatically reduces ground friction. The vehicle does not require sophisticated infrastructure such as a high-speed rail or maglev or hyperloop. It can be powered electrically, enabling Aerocity to use renewable energy sources. Aerocity can achieve a top speed of 500km/h.

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Design and evaluation of a novel haptic trainer for PAVs
Prof Heinrich Bülthoff, director, Max Plank Institute for Biological Cybernetics, GERMANY
This presentation shows that existing civil light helicopters can be augmented to achieve dynamics and handling qualities suitable for PAVs. Furthermore, a novel haptic trainer is presented, which can teach pilots how to stabilise a PAV helicopter in case of automation failure. The haptic trainer is suitable for flight simulators and is based on control algorithms that adaptively vary the intensity of the haptic force on pilot control devices, until the simulator behaves like a real (unaugmented) helicopter. Experiments show that naïve pilots can stabilise the unaugmented helicopter after two hours of training. This haptic trainer could be a time-saving tool for simulator training of PAV and helicopter pilots.

14:30 - Aviation goes electric – does this fit into current regulation?
Manfred Reichel, section manager, CS-23 Aeroplanes, European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), GERMANY
Due to the nature of aviation, the high level of public attention aviation gets, and the complexity of the worldwide network in the back, aviation is internationally well regulated and defined, and organised with only limited flexibility. The future possibilities with the upcoming new technology of electric propulsion, hybrid propulsion or More Electric Aircraft go far beyond the current regulations and boundaries. This presentation will give information on how the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) will support the introduction of electric and hybrid propulsion in aviation, and what companies need to take into account when going for electrification.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Using 'smart automation' and autonomy to enable on-demand mobility (ODM)
Steven Jacobson, president, Autonodyne LLC, USA
There are a number of areas that need further progress to allow ODM to be successful and see widespread adoption. Autonodyne will present the current state of the art and art of the possible for those areas we have under development. Actual results of our development efforts in multi-ship collaborative operations, 4D flight management, full envelope protection, total connectivity to vehicle (e.g. 'vehicle is always connected to the internet') and integration with the (inter)national airspace will be presented. A brief description of our efforts in redundant system monitors, sensor fusion and control station technology will also be presented.

16:30 - Unmanned aerial transportation network and urban environment
Xiangyu Li, CEO, Beijing Tanizon Tech LLC, USA
The civilian drone will become a revolutionary force to shape future transportation in the role of: carrier of high-spatial/temporal resolution data services; efficient first/last mile logistics solution; eco-friendly medium-to-short-distance PATS. A particularly under-studied part of the technology is how it would be integrated into urban environments. The data collection, navigation and the regulation of autonomous aerial vehicles rely on secure and affordable GNSS network and ICT technologies. First/last-mile logistics and passenger transportation through drone rely on upgraded warehouses, charging stations, drone zoning and drone parking.

More Speakers Being Added

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

GETTING TRANSPORTATION OFF THE GROUND

Moderator
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society, USA

10:10 - Pop.up: modular ground and air passenger concept vehicle system
Jörg Astalosch, CEO, Italdesign, ITALY
Mathias Thomsen, general manager, urban air mobility, Airbus, FRANCE
Several studies show that in the next few years the existing traffic situation in megacities will become even more demanding and the number of megacities will increase. Quality of life in those areas is expected to strongly diminish, and consequently all stakeholders are looking for scalable solutions to contribute to relieving congested roads and reducing emissions. The Pop.up project is more than a single vehicle. It is a whole new concept of mobility: modular, multi-modal, sharable, sustainable and high-tech, involving a whole new landscape, a new idea of transportation implying new infrastructures, new regulations and a new approach to mobility.

10:40 - From flying toys to flying taxis
Dr Stephen Wright, senior lecturer in Avionics and Aircraft Systems, University of the West of England, UK
Quads, UAVs, drones: call them what you will. One thing is clear: power, communications and control technologies have converged to cause a breakthrough in capability and cost, and create a new industry. The usage envelope is now expanding into safety-critical applications, to the extent that automatically piloted personal transport systems are being proposed. This talk examines the vast gulf that must be bridged between systems in the consumer drones that we see everywhere, and those for conventional aircraft. Why are they so cheap and easy to operate, while conventional aircraft are so expensive and demanding? How to cross that bridge?

11:10 - On-demand air taxi services – the future of urban transportation
Florian Reuter, chief executive officer, e-volo GmbH, GERMANY
The future will see an increase in demand for transportation services. Autonomous automobiles will not solve the problem as the road capacity enhancements will be overcompensated by an increase in driven miles. Congestion will continue to pose a serious challenge. On-demand air taxi services will be a fundamental piece of the puzzle to solve these challenges. Initially, we see an implementation of defined point-to-point connections, which will gradually be expanded into full air taxi networks – first piloted, later on-demand and fully autonomous. e-volo’s Volocopter offers revolutionary simplicity in piloting, unprecedented safety and the absence of emission and noise – which makes it the perfect vehicle solution for urban transportation.

11:40 - PATS – beginning or end of a love affair
Klaus Tritschler, partner, Kiska GmbH, AUSTRIA
Personal (electric, autonomous and semi-autonomous) VTOL vehicles are rapidly approaching reality. This paradigm shift in mobility is driven by new technology and the scientific masterminds behind it. Once the technology is proved and available to the market, our love affair will be put to the test. Most companies will likely fail. Only the companies that deliver a consistent and positive end-to-end user experience, and build a trustworthy brand, will ultimately succeed.

12:10 - The future of vertical flight
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society, USA
The helicopter has been the ubiquitous vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft for 75 years. Although many types of compound helicopters and other high-speed rotorcraft aircraft have flown, only the V-22 Osprey reached operational service in the 20th Century. Today, however, numerous advanced civil and military rotorcraft are in development with impressive capabilities. Even more promising is the advances in batteries, electric motors and autonomy that suggest a whole new paradigm shift may be dawning with the advent of electric VTOL aircraft. This presentation will cover the promise and progress of next generation VTOL aircraft in the 21st Century.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - A possible future history of the rise of electric VTOL
Darrell Swanson, principal consultant, AviaSolutions and a Board Member of the British Aviation Group, UK
In this presentation we will review the Uber Elevate paper and propose an alternative history of the rise of sub-regional airlines and eventual fulfilment of Uber’s vision. We will discuss the economics of such sub-regional airlines, outline their likely operating characteristics and identify factors that will be their enablers. Additionally, we will review how sub-regional airlines will reinvigorate beleaguered regional airports and give rise to sub-regional airports. We will also discuss the challenging economic and operating characteristics of airports looking to serve sub-regional airlines.

14:30 - Intra-City aerial mass transportation using internal Rotor Fancraft™
Dr Rafi Yoeli, president and CEO, Urban Aeronautics Ltd, ISRAEL
Following two decades of development, with over 200 successful flight tests of its unmanned 'Cormorant' Fancraft™, Urban Aeronautics is ready to launch its intra-city, Aerial Mass Transportation System initiative. The city of São-Paulo, Brazil, where a drive into the city takes 2.5 hours, is already setting an example for intra-city Air-Taxi systems. Currently, 500 helicopters fly executives to helipads on downtown São-Paulo office buildings every morning and ferrying them back out of the city at the end of the day. Urban Aeronautics envisions a future city having a much wider scale mass-transport, aerial system relying on VTOL aircraft having extraordinary seating capacity in relation to their radically reduced footprint. These attributes will be possible through the company's proprietary Fancraft™" technology. Reduced footprint will liberates future Air-Taxis from the requirement of immense, real-estate hungry, helipads and will bring an order of magnitude increase in passenger transfer capacity per hour compared to present day helicopters.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Cognitive demands and limitations for urban air transportation
Diogo Castilho, military officer and test pilot, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
We can make the use of urban airspace affordable for commuting. As new solutions in control and propulsion deal with noise and emissions limits, it is time to explore the challenges in human-machine interaction and certification. This work discusses the best level of automation for each task and the scenarios in which unsafe control actions interfere with safety. The cognitive limitations are analysed to present feasible mitigating measures for the safe use of vertical urban transportation. The testing phase of prototypes must explore those scenarios to prevent mode confusion and accidents related to the lack of situation awareness.

16:00 - 'Drone taxis' and liability – status and outlook
Gerhard Deiters, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
Today, wherever and whenever new technologies appear at the horizon, the question of 'liability' (and, as a reflex, 'data protection') is raised. What happens in the case of a drone accident? What are the air passengers' rights if the drone is delayed or has to stop its flight due to the battery running low? Before transportation can get off the ground, all these (and some more) questions have to be answered. The presentation provides an overview of the current situation and an outlook on what should come next.

16:30 - 17:00 - Round the Table Discussion
Will urban VTOL/ PAT transportation be achievable and a viable mode of transport within the next 15-30 years?
Jörg Astalosch, CEO, Italdesign, ITALY
Mathias Thomsen, general manager, urban air mobility, Airbus, FRANCE
Florian Reuter, chief executive officer, e-volo GmbH, GERMANY
Markus Farner, manager innovation and advanced technology, Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation, SWITZERLAND


Moderator:
Mike Hirschberg, executive director, AHS International - The Vertical Flight Technical Society

More Speakers Being Added

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

GETTING TRANSPORTATION OFF THE GROUND

Moderator
Darrell Swanson, principal consultant, AviaSolutions and a Board Member of the British Aviation Group, UK

09:00 - How German air traffic control plans to control and interface with low-level urban and inter-city ‘flyers'
Ralf Heidger, issue management UAS, DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH, GERMANY
The SESAR outlook study states that the UAS-based transport market segment will start to evolve with some delay, compared to other UAS segments like inspection, surveying, or agriculture. This delay is assumed due to a higher amount of regulative and conceptual preparation, because more risk is involved. There are several activities to note that are on the path to enable such operations: (1) The risk based approach of regulation by EASA elaborates a framework, where the DFS joined the task force to elaborate more precise classifications and related requirements on product certification, registration, identification, and qualification. (2) An European WG for 'U-Space' has been set up to create a concept of UAS traffic in VLL airspace, addressing airspace structure, operations, participants, and needed systems. (3) In JARUS the risk qualification method of 'Specific operation risk assessment' (SORA) has been developed, and the DFS together with representatives of German authorities applies this method in a project for medical transport in urban environment, and elaborates detailed criteria for safe operations. (4) An explorative project has been set up with DTAG, DHL and others to develop a prototypic UAS traffic management system (UTM), which studies aspects of surveillance, mission planning and validation in a number of use cases, including urban transport. Also the interface with ATM is addressed. The safe and fair integration of UAS-based transport will depend on suitable regulation as well as on the evolution of a preferably automated UTM system that provides situational awareness to all relevant participants. Insights and first results from these activities will be presented.

09:30 - What could a regulatory framework look like?
Dr Oliver Heinrich, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
'Classic' passenger transportation via taxi, bus, train and aircraft and transportation of goods is regulated to the tiniest details. For transportation via drones to get off the ground, a new and harmonised legal framework is required, including air traffic control systems (UTM), qualification standards and technical requirements. Further topics are insurance coverage and liability regimes, supporting market development. What is the current status and what could it be like?

10:00 - SORA – risk assessment for unmanned airborne mobility
Markus Farner, manager innovation and advanced technology, Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation, SWITZERLAND
Due the ever-increasing traffic density on all means of ground transportation, logistics and mobility in general are in need of radical new ideas. Mobility is becoming 'intelligent', with people and goods being transported in the most appropriate way by a combination of ground, underground, marine and airborne systems directed towards maximum time and cost efficiency. To be efficient and cost-effective, the new forms of mobility will leverage autonomous vehicles where no driver or pilot is required. As the Swiss CAA we are confronted with concepts and trials of automated logistics by using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS, drones) and automated surveillance of transportation infrastructure by drones. In Switzerland we have been authorising these trials since 2012 using a holistic and risk-based approach – the Guidance for an Authorisation for Low Level Operation (GALLO). In addition, we have led the efforts within the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) to further develop this method into an internationally recognised Specific Operational Risk Assessment (SORA). This new method is used in Switzerland to evaluate the risk of a UAS operation to third parties on the ground and in the air, and to define the required safety barriers as mitigation to ensure safe integration in the aviation system. Because the methodology of the SORA allows the risks associated with the operation as a whole to be understood, new concepts of risk mitigation are possible.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Handling qualities and training requirements for personal aerial vehicles
Dr Michael Jump, senior lecturer, University of Liverpool, UK
Current regulations require that the human must not be removed from the control loop of an air vehicle. This is in direct opposition to the desire of personal aerial vehicle (PAV) developers to create fully autonomous solutions. There my be an interim solution whereby the human will need to be able to take control when required. The presentation will report on results from the myCopter project that show the handling qualities requirements for a PAV and the associated training required for flight-naive occupants.

11:30 - Emission free aviation with hydrogen
Prof Josef Kallo, head of energy systems integration, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), GERMANY
Electric aircraft propulsion could change the way of using air transportation. In combination with low noise propulsors, city and regional transportation becomes realistic. From a 2-seater to a 40 seater aircraft new concepts rise on the horizon. This presentation will reveal latest developments in power train technology and aircraft integration and give an overview of the most feasible studies.

12:00 - Aerocity: a new chapter in high-speed transportation
Dr Arvind Gangoli Rao, associate professor, Delft University of Technology, NETHERLANDS
Aerocity is a new concept in high-speed transportation, which combines features from buses, trains and aircraft. Aerocity is shaped as a low-aspect-ratio wing, which provides lift for the vehicle, further amplified by the extreme wing-in-ground effect. This enables Aerocity to hover in close proximity to the ground and dramatically reduces ground friction. The vehicle does not require sophisticated infrastructure such as a high-speed rail or maglev or hyperloop. It can be powered electrically, enabling Aerocity to use renewable energy sources. Aerocity can achieve a top speed of 500km/h.

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Design and evaluation of a novel haptic trainer for PAVs
Prof Heinrich Bülthoff, director, Max Plank Institute for Biological Cybernetics, GERMANY
This presentation shows that existing civil light helicopters can be augmented to achieve dynamics and handling qualities suitable for PAVs. Furthermore, a novel haptic trainer is presented, which can teach pilots how to stabilise a PAV helicopter in case of automation failure. The haptic trainer is suitable for flight simulators and is based on control algorithms that adaptively vary the intensity of the haptic force on pilot control devices, until the simulator behaves like a real (unaugmented) helicopter. Experiments show that naïve pilots can stabilise the unaugmented helicopter after two hours of training. This haptic trainer could be a time-saving tool for simulator training of PAV and helicopter pilots.

14:30 - Aviation goes electric – does this fit into current regulation?
Manfred Reichel, section manager, CS-23 Aeroplanes, European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), GERMANY
Due to the nature of aviation, the high level of public attention aviation gets, and the complexity of the worldwide network in the back, aviation is internationally well regulated and defined, and organised with only limited flexibility. The future possibilities with the upcoming new technology of electric propulsion, hybrid propulsion or More Electric Aircraft go far beyond the current regulations and boundaries. This presentation will give information on how the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) will support the introduction of electric and hybrid propulsion in aviation, and what companies need to take into account when going for electrification.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Using 'smart automation' and autonomy to enable on-demand mobility (ODM)
Steven Jacobson, president, Autonodyne LLC, USA
There are a number of areas that need further progress to allow ODM to be successful and see widespread adoption. Autonodyne will present the current state of the art and art of the possible for those areas we have under development. Actual results of our development efforts in multi-ship collaborative operations, 4D flight management, full envelope protection, total connectivity to vehicle (e.g. 'vehicle is always connected to the internet') and integration with the (inter)national airspace will be presented. A brief description of our efforts in redundant system monitors, sensor fusion and control station technology will also be presented.

16:30 - Unmanned aerial transportation network and urban environment
Xiangyu Li, CEO, Beijing Tanizon Tech LLC, USA
The civilian drone will become a revolutionary force to shape future transportation in the role of: carrier of high-spatial/temporal resolution data services; efficient first/last mile logistics solution; eco-friendly medium-to-short-distance PATS. A particularly under-studied part of the technology is how it would be integrated into urban environments. The data collection, navigation and the regulation of autonomous aerial vehicles rely on secure and affordable GNSS network and ICT technologies. First/last-mile logistics and passenger transportation through drone rely on upgraded warehouses, charging stations, drone zoning and drone parking.

More Speakers Being Added

Personal airborne transportation systems (PATS) and autonomous drones capable of transporting people will quickly transition from being executive and VIP systems to being transport solutions potentially as popular as the car has been. We will be looking at the technologies and enablers of PATS and, in subsequent sessions, at how PATS will fit initially into the urban landscape.

Just some of the topics discussed in this stream will include:

  • Personal air transportation systems (PATS)
  • Personal aerial vehicles (PAVs)
  • Vertical take-off and landing technology
  • Advanced propulsion technology
  • Autonomous piloting systems
  • Third-dimensional mapping
  • Controlling and regulating airspace
  • Next-generation air traffic control systems
  • Socio-technological evaluation of PATS
  • Human factors and HMI study
  • Collision avoidance and route planning
  • Test and evaluation models and techniques
  • Safety systems
  • Market predictions and feasibility studies