Vision Zero

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

VISION ZERO

Moderator
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates, UK

10:10 - Adapting roads to the autonomous vehicle: the need for hybrid infrastructure
Konstandinos Diamandouros, head of office, European Union Road Federation, BELGIUM
Although there is a consensus that roads will become increasingly automated in the long run, the short to medium term will be characterised by a hybrid traffic flow that will feature the co-existence of conventional and increasingly autonomous vehicles. To reap the benefits of road automation, Europe’s policymakers need to start considering how road infrastructure can actually become hybrid insofar as it will be able to cater both for the needs of an increasingly ageing population and ADAS such as AEB, LKA and ISA. The presentation will explore the key issues and challenges around hybrid infrastructure.

10:40 - Vision Zero Advocate Institute: a future without serious injuries and fatalities
Jeffrey Calibaba, chief operating officer, ATS Traffic, CANADA
The Vision Zero Advocate Institute, a global leader in the adoption of Vision Zero, presents how the public and private sectors need to rethink their roles and responsibilities for traffic safety. As Vision Zero forces one of the largest shifts in transportation system design, it presents a proactive opportunity for change. Demonstrating the trajectory of Vision Zero through a detailed look at the Vision Zero Advocate Institute’s rise and plans for 2030, this presentation will examine the framework for the future, integration of systems approaches and a shift in transportation prioritisation from mobility to the importance of a human life.

11:10 - Some thoughts on Vision Zero from an ITS supplier
Dr Alexander Lewald, executive board member/CTO, Kapsch TrafficCom AG, AUSTRIA
We define Vision Zero as zero accidents, zero congestion and zero emissions. We will discuss how recent technology breakthroughs have enabled us to realise this vision within the next few years, so that we will have hybrid transportation (autonomous/non-autonomous vehicles) for the foreseeable future.

11:40 - A paradigm shift towards the zero accident vision
Dr Amirmasoud Soltani, lecturer - Active Chassis Control Development Environments for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, Cranfield University, UK
The current technologies to address vehicle safety, comfort and performance are usually focused on vehicle features themselves. However, the future transport systems will consist of networks of vehicles, in an integrated, interconnected and intelligent environment. In this presentation we discuss the influence of the four enabler technologies – electrification, control, autonomy and connectivity – and how they will shape the future of intelligent transport systems. The presentation will also address the necessity of rethinking the development approaches to address these challenges, and exploring the full benefits of the integrated development approach to provide a safe transportation environment towards the zero accident vision.

12:10 - Future of vehicle safety – what are the casualty reduction priorities?
Richard Cuerden, chief scientist, engineering & technology, TRL, UK
The presentation considers the likely benefits that will be realised if proposed changes to the European Union’s passenger car type-approval requirements, namely updates to the General Safety Regulation (EC 661/2009 published 2009) and Pedestrian Safety Regulation (EC 78/2009 published 2009) are adopted. The additional measures, which could become mandatory, include ADAS features such as AEB, ISA, LKA, driver distraction and drowsiness technologies and secondary safety measures designed to protect occupants and pedestrians in the event of a collision. Vision Zero requires a Safe System approach and it is important to quantify what emerging technologies are going to deliver with respect to collision prevention and injury mitigation in the next five to 10 years. This will provide an understanding of the future casualty prevention priorities and lead to the development of strategies that will include vehicle safety design and the performance criteria requirements for the next generation of connected and autonomous vehicles.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Future of automotive lighting
Michael Koherr, research engineering - advanced lighting, Ford Research & Advanced Engineering Center, GERMANY
Current headlamp technology provides a large number of features to support drivers. Nevertheless, the driving task will change in future with new generations of driver assistance technologies, while the driver will remain fully responsible. Accident statistics show clearly the necessity to improve visibility even more. As the sensor technology improves as quickly as the LED technology, all preconditions for further evolutions are given. Future lighting features are divided into comfort and supportive systems as well as supportive systems to help either the driver or the other road users, or both of them.

14:30 - Contribution of driverless cars towards zero-fatality: myths and reality
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates, UK
Autonomous driving technologies extend well beyond conventional onboard systems and offer clear potential to substantially reduced road accidents. Advocates of the driverless car believe it will be smarter, faster and safer than the human driver. Preliminary tests by leading OEMs show superior results hinting at a good possibility of creating an accident-free environment. The presenter will lay out the significant contribution of the various new technologies, potentially towards Vision Zero, as well as the implementation challenges within the current transport infrastructure and business/economic modelling.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Safety of active modes in urban mobility: a thought challenge
Prof Dirk Lauwers, professor, Ghent University, BELGIUM
Exposure-based road safety indicators for active modes (pedestrian and cyclist travel) are poorly documented in the EU. A proposal developed for the European Cyclists’ Federation – completing the EC-endorsed World Business Council for Sustainable Development Monitor SMP2.0 – is presented in this paper. Furthermore, dominant patterns of accidents with active modes in urban environments are identified. The approach and patterns are confronted with a critical review of automated vehicle interaction with these modes. Relevant technologies are discussed within a perspective of market introduction of different levels of vehicle automation.

16:00 - Pedestrian safety in the age of ubiquitous automated driving
Prof Horst Wieker, professor for Telecommunications, HTW Saar - University of Applied Sciences Saarland, GERMANY
Together with motorcyclists, pedestrians make up around 45% of all road fatalities worldwide. In contrast to vehicle users, pedestrians are seldom protected by driver assistance systems. More than any other traffic participant, they rely on the assistance systems of others to keep them safe. Furthermore, if more and more traffic participants rely on communication and active sensors to detect each other, pedestrians face a greater risk of being overlooked. We highlight concepts and research enhancing cooperative pedestrian safety. We also show the threats that a '100% protection guarantee' for pedestrians will pose to our current mode-mixed traffic infrastructure.

16:30 - 17:30 - Round Table Discussion
– Will Autonomous Vehicles Dramatically Reduce Road Fatalities and How Soon Will They Make a Significant Global Impact? Further panelists to be confirmed shortly will include a leading autonomous instigator and a key transport research institution
Dr Amirmasoud Soltani, lecturer - Active Chassis Control Development Environments for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, Cranfield University, UK
Richard Cuerden, chief scientist, engineering & technology, TRL, UK
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA


Moderator:
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

VISION ZERO

Moderator
Jeffrey Calibaba, chief operating officer, ATS Traffic, CANADA

09:00 - Vision Zero – the Swedish experience
Prof Anders Lie, specialist, Swedish Transport Administration, SWEDEN
Vision Zero was chosen as the main traffic safety strategy in Sweden by the parliament in 1997. Since then, the vision has been widely accepted. In this presentation, the basics of Vision Zero are presented along with examples of new strategies. Examples are given for road design, vehicles and road usage. An outlook is also given indicating examples of Vision Zero initiatives around the world.

09:30 - Warning for vulnerable road users by ADAS vehicles
Dr Peter Vertal, head of research, Institute of Forensic Research and Education (IFRE), SLOVAKIA
This paper provides a forensic view of real traffic accidents of pedestrians and their behaviour before the collision. The study of real pedestrian behaviour focuses on the implementation of exterior warning signals of a vehicle for the purposes of the ADAS system. This study used a set of more than 200 real traffic accidents involving cars and pedestrians. The accidents were recorded by vehicle dashboard cameras or CCTV cameras, providing a realistic statistical view of pedestrian behaviour before a collision and pedestrian reaction to an oncoming vehicle, and a statistical view of the fundamental aspects of the course of a traffic accident: weather conditions, traffic situation, driving style, type of walking, etc. This analysis shows possible pedestrian behaviour immediately before a collision, the response time and the pedestrian’s reaction (stopping, slowing down, stepping back, etc.) in cases where a pedestrian was not warned by an acoustic signal.

10:00 - The future of urban mobility
Roland Werner, head of government affairs and policy, DACH, Uber, GERMANY
This review will discuss how Uber certainly helps complement the first and last mile. People are more often leaving their own cars at home now. Uber is at its busiest when public transport shuts down or runs irregularly, giving passengers a far more reliable, safe and affordable option and helping people not to drink and drive.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - User-centred design for enhancing traffic safety in partly automated trucks
Max Ruppert, research associate, Institute for Mobility and Digital Innovation, Stuttgart Media University, GERMANY
Prof Arnd Engeln, market and advertising research and traffic and transport psychology, Stuttgart Media University, GERMANY
For automated driving systems to enhance traffic safety, they have to be accepted by the user. In the TANGO research project, funded by the BMWi, in cooperation with Bosch, MAN, VW and Stuttgart University, we apply the user-centred process to the development of a vigilance and activity management system. The system will enable truck drivers to engage in secondary tasks during automated driving phases. To ensure optimal user acceptance, the users will be integrated into the empirical research in all phases of the project. We will present the project outline and first results from qualitative user research.

11:30 - Ensuring safety and building trust in an autonomous world
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
The autonomous vehicle revolution is on the verge of mainstream adoption; however, many people continue to express worry about accuracy and passenger safety. Civil Maps, a Ford-funded company, is tackling the issues of safety and social acceptance by providing cognition for cars. This presentation will discuss the challenge of convincing passengers of autonomous vehicle safety; software solutions that integrate into autonomous vehicles, including localisation and augmented reality, to build trust and ensure safety; how AI can train cars to replicate the ways that humans think and enhance passenger safety.

12:00 - Does 'zero incident' really exist in the transport environment?
Dr Willem Sprong, technical executive, Gibb (Pty) Ltd, SOUTH AFRICA
The National Railway Safety Strategy for South Africa described the innovative new risk-balance model. This model supersedes Reason's Swiss-Cheese model and describes the importance of human factors in risk management. Risk is the product of probability that an incident will occur and the impact that it will have. It is impossible to have a zero probability. Effective and efficient risk management must include the proactive mitigation of the impact that incidents will have. The influence that human factors have on safety is explained, based on the new Risk-Balance model.

12:30 - Lifelong training for road users: a tool to improve road safety
Olivier Lenz, programme director, FIA - Federation Internationale de L'Automobile, BELGIUM
This presentation will explore the potential of training and education to contribute to the Vision Zero objective. As human error is still a major contributing factor to road casualties, mobility clubs have a clear role to play here. The FIA Region I advocates for lifelong learning opportunities from a younger to an older age. We support measures such as mandatory traffic education for children across EU 28, a revision of the Driving Licence Directive including multi-phase training systems, and the promotion of voluntary refresher and assessment driving courses for elderly drivers.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

More Speakers Being Added

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

VISION ZERO

Moderator
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates, UK

10:10 - Adapting roads to the autonomous vehicle: the need for hybrid infrastructure
Konstandinos Diamandouros, head of office, European Union Road Federation, BELGIUM
Although there is a consensus that roads will become increasingly automated in the long run, the short to medium term will be characterised by a hybrid traffic flow that will feature the co-existence of conventional and increasingly autonomous vehicles. To reap the benefits of road automation, Europe’s policymakers need to start considering how road infrastructure can actually become hybrid insofar as it will be able to cater both for the needs of an increasingly ageing population and ADAS such as AEB, LKA and ISA. The presentation will explore the key issues and challenges around hybrid infrastructure.

10:40 - Vision Zero Advocate Institute: a future without serious injuries and fatalities
Jeffrey Calibaba, chief operating officer, ATS Traffic, CANADA
The Vision Zero Advocate Institute, a global leader in the adoption of Vision Zero, presents how the public and private sectors need to rethink their roles and responsibilities for traffic safety. As Vision Zero forces one of the largest shifts in transportation system design, it presents a proactive opportunity for change. Demonstrating the trajectory of Vision Zero through a detailed look at the Vision Zero Advocate Institute’s rise and plans for 2030, this presentation will examine the framework for the future, integration of systems approaches and a shift in transportation prioritisation from mobility to the importance of a human life.

11:10 - Some thoughts on Vision Zero from an ITS supplier
Dr Alexander Lewald, executive board member/CTO, Kapsch TrafficCom AG, AUSTRIA
We define Vision Zero as zero accidents, zero congestion and zero emissions. We will discuss how recent technology breakthroughs have enabled us to realise this vision within the next few years, so that we will have hybrid transportation (autonomous/non-autonomous vehicles) for the foreseeable future.

11:40 - A paradigm shift towards the zero accident vision
Dr Amirmasoud Soltani, lecturer - Active Chassis Control Development Environments for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, Cranfield University, UK
The current technologies to address vehicle safety, comfort and performance are usually focused on vehicle features themselves. However, the future transport systems will consist of networks of vehicles, in an integrated, interconnected and intelligent environment. In this presentation we discuss the influence of the four enabler technologies – electrification, control, autonomy and connectivity – and how they will shape the future of intelligent transport systems. The presentation will also address the necessity of rethinking the development approaches to address these challenges, and exploring the full benefits of the integrated development approach to provide a safe transportation environment towards the zero accident vision.

12:10 - Future of vehicle safety – what are the casualty reduction priorities?
Richard Cuerden, chief scientist, engineering & technology, TRL, UK
The presentation considers the likely benefits that will be realised if proposed changes to the European Union’s passenger car type-approval requirements, namely updates to the General Safety Regulation (EC 661/2009 published 2009) and Pedestrian Safety Regulation (EC 78/2009 published 2009) are adopted. The additional measures, which could become mandatory, include ADAS features such as AEB, ISA, LKA, driver distraction and drowsiness technologies and secondary safety measures designed to protect occupants and pedestrians in the event of a collision. Vision Zero requires a Safe System approach and it is important to quantify what emerging technologies are going to deliver with respect to collision prevention and injury mitigation in the next five to 10 years. This will provide an understanding of the future casualty prevention priorities and lead to the development of strategies that will include vehicle safety design and the performance criteria requirements for the next generation of connected and autonomous vehicles.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Future of automotive lighting
Michael Koherr, research engineering - advanced lighting, Ford Research & Advanced Engineering Center, GERMANY
Current headlamp technology provides a large number of features to support drivers. Nevertheless, the driving task will change in future with new generations of driver assistance technologies, while the driver will remain fully responsible. Accident statistics show clearly the necessity to improve visibility even more. As the sensor technology improves as quickly as the LED technology, all preconditions for further evolutions are given. Future lighting features are divided into comfort and supportive systems as well as supportive systems to help either the driver or the other road users, or both of them.

14:30 - Contribution of driverless cars towards zero-fatality: myths and reality
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates, UK
Autonomous driving technologies extend well beyond conventional onboard systems and offer clear potential to substantially reduced road accidents. Advocates of the driverless car believe it will be smarter, faster and safer than the human driver. Preliminary tests by leading OEMs show superior results hinting at a good possibility of creating an accident-free environment. The presenter will lay out the significant contribution of the various new technologies, potentially towards Vision Zero, as well as the implementation challenges within the current transport infrastructure and business/economic modelling.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Safety of active modes in urban mobility: a thought challenge
Prof Dirk Lauwers, professor, Ghent University, BELGIUM
Exposure-based road safety indicators for active modes (pedestrian and cyclist travel) are poorly documented in the EU. A proposal developed for the European Cyclists’ Federation – completing the EC-endorsed World Business Council for Sustainable Development Monitor SMP2.0 – is presented in this paper. Furthermore, dominant patterns of accidents with active modes in urban environments are identified. The approach and patterns are confronted with a critical review of automated vehicle interaction with these modes. Relevant technologies are discussed within a perspective of market introduction of different levels of vehicle automation.

16:00 - Pedestrian safety in the age of ubiquitous automated driving
Prof Horst Wieker, professor for Telecommunications, HTW Saar - University of Applied Sciences Saarland, GERMANY
Together with motorcyclists, pedestrians make up around 45% of all road fatalities worldwide. In contrast to vehicle users, pedestrians are seldom protected by driver assistance systems. More than any other traffic participant, they rely on the assistance systems of others to keep them safe. Furthermore, if more and more traffic participants rely on communication and active sensors to detect each other, pedestrians face a greater risk of being overlooked. We highlight concepts and research enhancing cooperative pedestrian safety. We also show the threats that a '100% protection guarantee' for pedestrians will pose to our current mode-mixed traffic infrastructure.

16:30 - 17:30 - Round Table Discussion
– Will Autonomous Vehicles Dramatically Reduce Road Fatalities and How Soon Will They Make a Significant Global Impact? Further panelists to be confirmed shortly will include a leading autonomous instigator and a key transport research institution
Dr Amirmasoud Soltani, lecturer - Active Chassis Control Development Environments for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, Cranfield University, UK
Richard Cuerden, chief scientist, engineering & technology, TRL, UK
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA


Moderator:
Miguel Fragoso-Recio, managing partner, Syrma & Associates

More Speakers Being Added

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

VISION ZERO

Moderator
Jeffrey Calibaba, chief operating officer, ATS Traffic, CANADA

09:00 - Vision Zero – the Swedish experience
Prof Anders Lie, specialist, Swedish Transport Administration, SWEDEN
Vision Zero was chosen as the main traffic safety strategy in Sweden by the parliament in 1997. Since then, the vision has been widely accepted. In this presentation, the basics of Vision Zero are presented along with examples of new strategies. Examples are given for road design, vehicles and road usage. An outlook is also given indicating examples of Vision Zero initiatives around the world.

09:30 - Warning for vulnerable road users by ADAS vehicles
Dr Peter Vertal, head of research, Institute of Forensic Research and Education (IFRE), SLOVAKIA
This paper provides a forensic view of real traffic accidents of pedestrians and their behaviour before the collision. The study of real pedestrian behaviour focuses on the implementation of exterior warning signals of a vehicle for the purposes of the ADAS system. This study used a set of more than 200 real traffic accidents involving cars and pedestrians. The accidents were recorded by vehicle dashboard cameras or CCTV cameras, providing a realistic statistical view of pedestrian behaviour before a collision and pedestrian reaction to an oncoming vehicle, and a statistical view of the fundamental aspects of the course of a traffic accident: weather conditions, traffic situation, driving style, type of walking, etc. This analysis shows possible pedestrian behaviour immediately before a collision, the response time and the pedestrian’s reaction (stopping, slowing down, stepping back, etc.) in cases where a pedestrian was not warned by an acoustic signal.

10:00 - The future of urban mobility
Roland Werner, head of government affairs and policy, DACH, Uber, GERMANY
This review will discuss how Uber certainly helps complement the first and last mile. People are more often leaving their own cars at home now. Uber is at its busiest when public transport shuts down or runs irregularly, giving passengers a far more reliable, safe and affordable option and helping people not to drink and drive.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - User-centred design for enhancing traffic safety in partly automated trucks
Max Ruppert, research associate, Institute for Mobility and Digital Innovation, Stuttgart Media University, GERMANY
Prof Arnd Engeln, market and advertising research and traffic and transport psychology, Stuttgart Media University, GERMANY
For automated driving systems to enhance traffic safety, they have to be accepted by the user. In the TANGO research project, funded by the BMWi, in cooperation with Bosch, MAN, VW and Stuttgart University, we apply the user-centred process to the development of a vigilance and activity management system. The system will enable truck drivers to engage in secondary tasks during automated driving phases. To ensure optimal user acceptance, the users will be integrated into the empirical research in all phases of the project. We will present the project outline and first results from qualitative user research.

11:30 - Ensuring safety and building trust in an autonomous world
Sravan Puttagunta, CEO and co-founder, Civil Maps, USA
The autonomous vehicle revolution is on the verge of mainstream adoption; however, many people continue to express worry about accuracy and passenger safety. Civil Maps, a Ford-funded company, is tackling the issues of safety and social acceptance by providing cognition for cars. This presentation will discuss the challenge of convincing passengers of autonomous vehicle safety; software solutions that integrate into autonomous vehicles, including localisation and augmented reality, to build trust and ensure safety; how AI can train cars to replicate the ways that humans think and enhance passenger safety.

12:00 - Does 'zero incident' really exist in the transport environment?
Dr Willem Sprong, technical executive, Gibb (Pty) Ltd, SOUTH AFRICA
The National Railway Safety Strategy for South Africa described the innovative new risk-balance model. This model supersedes Reason's Swiss-Cheese model and describes the importance of human factors in risk management. Risk is the product of probability that an incident will occur and the impact that it will have. It is impossible to have a zero probability. Effective and efficient risk management must include the proactive mitigation of the impact that incidents will have. The influence that human factors have on safety is explained, based on the new Risk-Balance model.

12:30 - Lifelong training for road users: a tool to improve road safety
Olivier Lenz, programme director, FIA - Federation Internationale de L'Automobile, BELGIUM
This presentation will explore the potential of training and education to contribute to the Vision Zero objective. As human error is still a major contributing factor to road casualties, mobility clubs have a clear role to play here. The FIA Region I advocates for lifelong learning opportunities from a younger to an older age. We support measures such as mandatory traffic education for children across EU 28, a revision of the Driving Licence Directive including multi-phase training systems, and the promotion of voluntary refresher and assessment driving courses for elderly drivers.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

More Speakers Being Added

Can there really be scope to create a zero-fatality transport environment? The building blocks are apparent already, but is the zero vision a reality on the surface and in the air? And if not, what can we expect to see in terms of better life-saving systems and methods? Drones are already being developed to deliver essential equipment to paramedics, so it may be that Vision Zero is achieved through a combination of inputs and developments.